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Process Philosophy - essays



Some essays and assorted writings

 
Alfred North Whitehead developed a complex metaphysics of 'process' in which he rejected the idea of "matter" being the primary stuff of existence. In its place he regarded "events" as the basis for reality, with each entity being at the centre of its own creative and creating universe. Reality is embedded in the process of coming into being, of making something new. Reality is never static, the solidity of objects being our perception of an already completed past. The future is literally ours to create. And the present is the centre of our emergence into being. Some related links are below. Paul 'thinking'
The Priority of God: speculating on First Being is a paper based on one of my Masters papers in which I explored the implications of a primary being (aka God). It takes a non-theistic view of primacy and explores the question mainly via the process philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead. 114kb pdf

Retrieving the status of dream: towards a Process revision of Freud looks at the Freudian theory of dream through the lens of process metaphysics. The essay draws on similarities in descriptive method, notably with regard to the drawing together of diverse elements into a final unity. The sharp difference between Freud and Whitehead is that the former is forever looking back to the past; Whitehead sought to push all endeavour into an endlessly creative future. His clarion call was "Creative advance". 74kb pdf

Inter-subjectivity and process categorization: co-agency in a unitive paradigm is the less than helpful title I gave my Masters dissertation. The abstract probably isn't much clearer:

Using the Bible as a paradigmatic foundation, the paper discusses the notion of personhood within the context of Whiteheadís process metaphysics. Special attention is paid to the establishment of inter-subjective relationship, and the argument is made for co-agency within a unitive paradigm as a necessary condition of our understanding of ourselves as persons. In the development of a co-agentive process model, consideration is given in particular to Feuerbachian projection and the notion of the self as a project.

Rather more succinctly, the paper argues for human inter-relationship and co-agency and treats the self (and God) largely as constructs. It's generally 'person-centred' in its approach. 159k pdf

Farrer, Feuerbach and Process - the divine human as paradigm was my first formal (i.e. assessed) paper as a postgrad. Basically an untutored attempt at Christology, it hints at the lines of thought I am now following in positing the idea of human projects gaining self-sustaining agency. 88kb pdf

Language, conflict and coherence in the Bible. This essay explores the language of the Bible, and in particular the relationship between the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament. It contrasts the communal focus of the former with the personalist principle embedded in the latter. 90kb pdf

A Speculation on Time. This is a short extract from a piece in 'Painful But Fabulous', more of which on the news page. It discusses the notion of a 'thickness of time' in a process philosophy context. 40kb pdf

A Response to Joseph Brackenís "Prehending God in and through the World", published in Process Studies pp. 358-364, Vol. 29, Number 2, Fall-Winter, 2000. The short paper is a response to Joseph Bracken's paper Prehending God in and through the World. Both papers web-published at religion-online

Changing Cultures in Organizations: A Process of Organic-ization. This is my paper on process and change management, presented at the 2003 St Andrew's Conference and published on-line by Concrescence.

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